Baby Boomers And Millennials Are Alike

Whenever I start a training session saying that Baby Boomers And Millennials Are Alike I get a lot of raised eyebrows and smirks. But convincing my audience is pretty easy actually.

Baby Boomers And Millennials Are Alike

Image courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net

No doubt there are often frustrations at work between the three primary generations. And as the group of people sandwiched between Boomers and Millennials, Generation X individuals experience a bit of all of the frustrations.

But between Boomers and Millennials what ends up happening is that:

  • Many Boomers feel:

o   Millennials lack motivation

o   Millennials are not loyal

o   Millennials don’t listen… and feel the world should revolve around them

  • Many Millennials feel:

o   Boomers are unclear with expectations

o   Boomers spend too much time at work / working

o   Boomers are impatient… and feel the world should revolve around them

And let’s be honest, many of these impressions are true. But there is also so much that is amazing with all three generations. So, instead of being frustrated by what is different… what if Boomers, Millennials… and Generation Xers were to recognize each others similarities and celebrate each others strengths and differences? What if we found a way to collaborate and synergize?

The healthy – cooperative – supportive mix of Boomers, Gen X and Millennials can propel any relationship and company into the stratosphere. Therefore, I think incorporating Mindfulness might be the answer.

What Is Mindfulness?

At a very high-level, Mindfulness is about becoming aware of your needs and your feelings while also caring about the needs and feelings of others. Mindfulness is about learning to provide space for others to add their uniqueness to the conversation – and to recognize that while you and I might have very different needs, it is possible to work together to satisfy each others needs… instead of fighting and neither of us achieving our goals.

As a corporate trainer teaching Mindful Listening, I see how Mindfulness is a corporate shift in values based on respect, balance and sustainability.

Synergize not Compromise / Engage not Frustrate

Baby Boomers and Millennials Are Alike

When Boomers were 20 something they were going to change the world. Boomers were excited about new ideas, were not going to slow down and they lived based on their own values – not those of their parents. Boomers believed they could do anything. Young Boomers wanted to live life to the fullest – respect each other – embrace differences / diversity and love the planet. They were smart, industrial, creative and they were the most educated population that had ever existed. This sounds like a Millennial to me.

Then… Boomers Started Families & Companies Started Laying Off Employees

As Boomers began getting married and having families their priorities changed. They gave up a few of their dreams, realizing their families’ security depended on a stable environment and a steady income. Along the way they worked harder and harder – began going into work a few hours on a weekend, and even began identifying success, dedication and loyalty with long hours.

25 – 35 years ago employee/employer loyalty was also very straightforward; if you were loyal and hard-working your company would be loyal to you. But that isn’t the case anymore. For the last 20 years Boomers (and their children), have seen layoffs at all levels – in all industries.  No matter how senior you are or how many years you’ve ‘invested’ in the company – you are not safe.

And yet, we wonder why Millennials are not loyal? Could it be that while they were growing up their Boomer parents taught them that they could only count on themselves?

Millennials Have Been Set-up For A Challenge

Millennials are smart, creative, the most educated and the most connected youth ever… and their social values are terrific. Millennials plan is to live life to the fullest – respect each other – embrace differences / diversity and love the planet. This sounds like a 20 something Boomer to me.

Baby Boomers And Millennials Are Alike

Image courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net

And while Millennials exude energy, ideas and comfort with technology, they also have exponentially more social pressure than any previous generation; their families and social network is watching… all the time.

In addition, Millennials are challenged because they have been told by their Boomer parents and their educators that the world is their oyster and to not settle. Unfortunately, while Millennials are smart, creative and agile… they lack experience… I mean long-term “I’ve been doing this for 20 years” experience – you know – the experience that Boomers and Generation X have.

This Is The Opportunity

I think we need to turn back the clock to a time when work/ life balance was commonplace – not a luxury. We need to all give each other an opportunity to have a life – to not expect working 10 hours a day and one or two days on a weekend ALL THE TIME.  We have to let ourselves go home and be with our family and friends and grandchildren – and not check our smartphones before we go to bed. We have to make working at 10PM (or midnight), an exception… or out of the question… not the rule.

One of the great lessons Boomers can now share with Millennials is patience… that the whole world doesn’t change in the span of a university semester. That knowing something can take months – but becoming an expert can take years. That the value Millennials have is knowledge, creativity, agility… and that the value Boomers have is experience, wisdom. And together… WOW… what an awesome team… they could be… if only.

Conclusion

Millennials expect to be engaged, involved, inspired and proud of their work… and if they don’t get this they leave… because that is what Boomer parents taught their children to do. And really, this is not so different from what Boomers wanted – and still want from their work.

Boomers and Generation Xers have to remember what they wanted when they were 20 something. What were their ambitions and values… because these ambitions and values were great… are great!  There is still opportunity for Boomers and Generation Xers to bring these values and teamwork into their work as great mentors – and great co-workers with Millennials.  But Boomers and Generation Xers also  have to embrace change – to learn to sit back and patiently listen to new ideas – and to help Millennials to learn to sit back and patiently listen to experience.

So is it true Baby Boomers and Millennials are alike? I say yes!

Happy communicating and creating workplace harmony.

Click here to join our priority list of people who receive our latest Business Communication blog posts.

If you enjoyed this post we think you’ll like:

Bruce Mayhew Consulting facilitates courses including Email Etiquette, Managing Difficult Conversations, Multigenerational Training, Time Management and Mindfulness.

Find answers to your Professional Development questions / needs at brucemayhewconsulting.com.

Give us a call at 416 617 0462. We’ll listen.

Bruce Mayhew on Canada AM

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I’d enjoy reading your comments on this post.

The Return Of Soft Skills At Work

Are soft skills the new must have by potential employers?

Many Millennials and Generation Z’s are graduating college and university and not finding work – all the while many corporate executives are saying they are having a difficult time finding qualified employees. How could this be? Todays young adults are the most educated and most worldly 20 something’s… ever.

Could part of the answer be a soft skills at work deficiency?  Some employers are saying yes.

I’m not saying degrees are not valuable. People with degrees are still more highly employed and earn higher salaries than individuals without a degrees.  But employers are starting to look for something more than technical / scholastic knowledge. In a 2014 article written by Anita Bruzzese of USA Today, Bruzzese suggests many businesses are frustrated with younger workers because they, “lack the proper business skills and other professional abilities that will help make them good employees.” And if soft skills are in demand, then its no surprise that schools – from high schools to universities – are beginning to offer (supply), courses that teach soft-skills.

hard skills and soft skills at work

Image courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net

In a 2013 interview with The New York Times, Google (who are actively measuring soft skills and looking for ways to improve them), revealed that the number of their degree-less hires is increasing.  Many business leaders agree with Google’s Senior Vice President for People Operations Laszlo Bock when she suggests “After two or three years, your ability to perform at Google is completely unrelated to how you performed when you were in school, because the skills you required in college are very different. You’re also fundamentally a different person. You learn and grow, you think about things differently.” 

When I interview potential employees I use a BEI interview framework. A BEI lets me measure a candidate’s core competency in the soft skills and hard skills I identify as important for success. I’m looking for candidates to demonstrate real (not hypothetical) examples of skills like:

  • Communication – Soft Skill
  • Economic (Supply/Demand) theories – Hard Skill
  • Creativity – Soft Skill
  • Strategy & project plans – Hard Skill
  • Ability to collaborate and work independently – Soft Skill
  • Accounting, finance & spreadsheets – Hard Skill

What Are Hard Skills and Soft Skills?

Hard skills are easy for an employer to recognize. Examples of hard skills include:

  1. Proficiency in a foreign language
  2. Proven skill like a doctor, engineer or architect
  3. Typing speed
  4. Machine operation
  5. Computer programming

Soft skills are also known as ‘People Skills’ or ‘Interpersonal Skills’. Examples of soft skills include:

  1. Teamwork / Motivation
  2. Customer service approach / Communication
  3. Flexibility
  4. Patience
  5. Time management

There are certainly some careers like doctors, engineers and architects where a formal education and technical knowledge is mandatory; but they also need to have respectful awareness of soft skills. Don’t you want the architect who designs your house to emphatically listen to your needs?

Employers are looking increasingly for job applicants who can confidently demonstrate soft skills.

Image courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Example

Bethany Perkins, HR Manager at Software Advice says, “We’ve found that being good at school and being good at your job aren’t mutually exclusive.” An example of the jobs they are hiring for are Inside Sales, Media Relations and Client Success Coordinators. Perkins continues, “Real work experience is typically much more valuable than a degree. A proven history of success in the workplace provides better benchmarks for us to evaluate the potential success of a candidate than a GPA can. Even more specialized roles, such as a UX Designer, Managing Editors don’t require a degree at Software Advice. I love seeing people who are self-taught in their field because it demonstrates a true passion for their work.”

Perkins brings up a good point; real work experience is desirable! So, this provides three additional options when hiring externally:

  • Look for candidates who have worked for a while getting real work experience and then gone back to school (which happens quite a bit when the market takes a down-turn… like it has over the last 6+ years).
  • Look for candidates who have participated in education intern programs. This gives them some experience along with their education.
  • Lastly, look for candidates who took a year or two off before finishing their degree. It doesn’t seem to matter if they traveled or worked in a restaurant; any real work experiences seem to help communicate and work with others.

Conclusion

More and more organizations are making client experience a promise, which means empathy, mutual respect, mindful communication and mindful listening are essential for your long-term professional AND personal success. It’s important to know what clients, co-workers and your associates want… and how they feel.

In a recent post in aol jobs written by Kate Lorenz, she identifies that human resources expert Lori Kocon, “Advises all job candidates — especially those who aspire to managerial positions — to get in touch with their soft sides.” Some of the soft skills employers are looking for include:

  1. Strong Work Ethic: Dedicated to getting the job done
  2. Good Communication Skills: One-on-one or in a team – are verbally articulate, a patient listener and can write professionally
  3. Time Management Abilities: Know how to prioritize responsibilities
  4. Problem-Solving Skills: Can creatively solve problems inline with corporate brand and values
  5. Uses Feedback As A Learning Opportunity: Able to handle criticism from a boss, coach or mentor 

So, as an employer – know you are not alone in your Trek for employees with both soft and hard skills and for potential employees, be sure you demonstrate your hard and soft skills on your resume and in your job interview.

Happy communicating and creating workplace harmony.

Click here to join our priority list of people who receive our latest Business Communication blog posts.

If you enjoyed this post we think you’ll like:

Bruce Mayhew Consulting facilitates courses including Email Etiquette, Managing Difficult Conversations, Multigenerational Training, Time Management and Mindfulness.

Find answers to your Professional Development questions / needs at brucemayhewconsulting.com.

Give us a call at 416 617 0462. We’ll listen.

Bruce Mayhew on Canada AM

Click on the image to watch us on Canada AM.

I’d enjoy reading your comments on this post.

Peace, Productivity, and How To Say No

How to say No is a popular discussion during my Time Management training workshops. Participants are so concerned, I now dedicate a whole module to how to say No.

Saying No is stressful. We hate saying No. We feel guilty saying No. Yet, if we don’t say No – at least sometimes – we risk burnout, not meeting our own goals/objectives and perhaps even physical illness.

As a business owner whose success depends on my clients being happy, I understand there are many times that saying Yes is the right thing to do.  Important situations OR opportunities will arise where we will want to roll up our sleeves and put aside our planned Important Work.  But lets be really clear that every time we say Yes, it’s an interruption to our own Important Work which translates to putting the quality of our Important Work and our work/life balance at risk.  

Saying Yes is a serious productivity and employee satisfaction challenge.  

What Are We Risking When We Say Yes… or Say No? 

How To Say No

*Sharpen The Saw is Habit #7 of Stephen R. Coveys 7 Habits Of Highly Effective People.

There are two sides to every action – for example, if you are saying Yes to helping someone, you are also saying No to your objectives; you are putting your QI and QII plans / objectives in jeopardy. If you say Yes – are you compromising what is important to you? 

How To Say No

*Sharpen The Saw is Habit #7 of Stephen R. Coveys 7 Habits Of Highly Effective People.

The above demonstrates that you accept many risks when you say Yes… and there are perhaps many more benefits to saying No than you might have expected.

In so many ways, if you are not caring for yourself first you risk being overwhelmed.

Saying Yes Puts Our Priorities & Work/Life Balance In Jeopardy

What do we say Yes to?

  • Long hours at the office
  • Friends needing a favour… all the time
  • Clients that… need… and need
  • Habits like late night news and junk food

Saying Yes puts you in harmony with others (for a short time), vs. always being in harmony with yourself or your goals.

I don’t think it’s surprising that people who say Yes are often:

  • Dedicated
  • Take pride in doing good work
  • Do ‘What’s Necessary’ for the team/company

Unfortunately that means these dedicated employees also:

  • Work nights and weekends regularly
  • Often / always feel behind
  • Risk burnout
  • Eventually seek out new opportunities where they can regain work/life balance

I always ask attendees in my Time Management training workshops to evaluate if they are putting their personal and corporate dreams and long-term goals (QI and QII goals), in jeopardy. So, let me ask you, “Do you put your personal and corporate dreams and long-term goals (QI and QII goals), in jeopardy?

It’s Hard To Say No

It’s natural to struggle with your feelings when you say No… feeling like you are not a team player – worrying about when you will need to ask someone for something or a favour.

It’s also fantastic to feel liked and helpful. Coming to the rescue of someone in crisis feels good… but the cost might be high… for you.

Solution To… How To Say No

If you don’t want to say No, can you say, ‘Yes… but not now’?

For Example, instead of interrupting your Important Work, say, “Yes, can you give me until 3PM? I can be all yours at 3PM and I have a full hour available.”

Let them know care about them. Don’t be cold – be empathetic. Take the time to say No… or not now with respect for yourself and the other person.

Explaining why will be much better received – and the people will respect you and your time.

Conclusion

Stopping your Important Work lowers your concentration, productivity and puts your deadlines at risk.  Saying No can be an important friend… helping you keep your big picture in mind.

If you learn to say No even 30% the time, that will make a difference to YOUR success.

Say No wisely – let it help you avoid stressful, urgent situations. Saying No is a way for you and your organization to be more productive. 

Happy communicating, creating workplace harmony and reducing employee turnover.

Click here to join our priority list of people who receive our latest Business Communication blog posts.

If you enjoyed this post we think you’ll like:

Bruce Mayhew Consulting facilitates courses including Email Etiquette, Managing Difficult Conversations, Multigenerational Training, Time Management and Mindfulness.

Find answers to your Professional Development questions / needs at brucemayhewconsulting.com.

Give us a call at 416 617 0462. We’ll listen.

Bruce Mayhew on Canada AM

Click on the image to watch us on Canada AM.

I’d enjoy reading your comments on this post.

Habit 7: Sharpen The Saw: 7 Habits Of Highly Effective People

Sharpen The Saw is a conversation about planning and continuous improvement.

Sharpen The Saw discusses self-renewal, self-care, self-respect and self-improvement… so as the last chapter of The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, I believe this chapter also represents why most people initially decide to read this personal change book… their desire to improve. I see the previous 7 Habits as being foundational… and if you work with them, the previous 7 Habits build a very necessary and helpful foundation that will serve you well.

So… how do you Sharpen Your Saw?

The Pace Of Change: Using Myself As An Example

The pace of change keeps accelerating, which I feel makes it even more important that we focus on improving ourselves and/or our organizations. Millennials and Generation Z employees are on a never-ending quest for knowledge and self-improvement… and Gen X and Boomers were self-improvement pioneers. As owner of a corporate training company, ongoing learning and helping others with personal change is critical; so I Sharpen The Saw in areas like:

  • What is changing in my industry?
  • What interests my clients?
  • How can I improve?
  • How can I help others improve?
  • What interests me?

I also Sharpen The Saw by focusing on personal well-being. Quiet time, rest, exercise, giving back to my community, enjoying family / friends, being creative, enjoying art and music are all activities for which I make time.

To help us all figure out our relationship with time, personal change and… Sharpening The Saw… Stephen R. Covey balances the concept across 4 main categories (or dimensions).  These dimensions are:

Sharpen The Saw: 7 Habits Of Highly Effective People

Stephen R. Covey

  • Physical
  • Spiritual
  • Mental
  • Social / Emotional

Whether we are speaking of people, departments or organizations, Sharpening The Saw must be balanced across these four ‘dimensions’… otherwise an imbalance would be created. We can offset an imbalance for a while, but not long-term. When organizations ignore four-dimensional balance, inefficiencies, defensiveness and lack of synergy (Habit 6) ensues creating a loss in productively, customer satisfaction and ultimately profitability.

Ongoing Process of Sharpening The Saw

Sharpening The Saw is an ongoing process of personal change – not something you can binge – like your favourite TV show on Netflix (which I sometimes do). You need to define your own balanced, four-dimensional life to be successful! If you are a leader, I believe part of your role is to help the people who report into you and/or look up to you (your family), explore these dimensions and establish goals for themselves.

Stephen quotes Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, “Treat a man as he is (or as you see him), and he will remain as he is.  Treat a man as he can and should be and he will become as he can and should be.”

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe was a German writer and politician born August 28, 1749 and died March 22, 1832. Wikipedia

We all have busy lifestyles; therefore it’s no surprise we have to insert Sharpen The Saw into our Time Management best practices and make it part of our Quadrant II priorities (Habit 3). Our future success and ongoing reputation depends on us taking action.

Stephen says, “It means exercising all four dimensions of our nature, regularly and consistently in a wise and balanced way.  To do this we have to be proactive.”  I love the words exercise and balance.  Proactive means we have to plan for it – to put it in our schedule and protect the time (Quadrant II), for all 4 of the above mentioned dimensions.

Self improvement takes time – just like working out and getting fit.  Stephen sees self-improvement as a never-ending upward spiral of ‘Learn, Commit, Do’. Personally I see it as a never-ending spiral of ‘Commit, Learn, Do.’ No matter what your preference of order of those three words, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People is something you have to be mindful of and continually practice.

Covey: The Upward Spiral

Stephen R. Covey

When you begin working out, a trainer will help you receive maximum benefit and minimize injury. In the same vein, a personal coach will help guide your personal change and keep you on track.

What Is Your Purpose? What Are You Committed To? 

If you work with a personal coach, get them to help you define what your motivator is.  What do you want to do / be?  What are your values?  How do your core competencies need to migrate?  What inspires you?  How can you live with purpose and integrity… following our values. How can you stay focused on:

  • Win/Win… Habit 4
  • Listening… Habit 5
  • Synergize… Habit 6

Sharpening the Personal Saw helps center you

Sharpening the Organizational Saw helps prepare

  • Religion
  • Meditation / Mindfulness
  • Music / Reading
  • Nature walks / Bike Rides
  • Gardening
  • On-The-Job Training / Cross-training
  • Other / Evening Professional Development Resources
  • A focus on productivity and quality
  • A focus on Important Work vs Busy Work

Sharpening The Saw is anything that will help you renew your energy and keep you balanced.

Again, how do you Sharpen Your Saw (keep the four dimensions in mind)? Screen Shot 2014-03-11 at 5.59.13 PM

How you sharp the saw is personal.  For example, what if you took one night / week without TV to get in touch with your values? Instead of TV you:

  • Read for pleasure (not work)
  • Read for school or a night class
  • Made art
  • Cooked all night with your family / friends because you love to cook not because you have to cook.
  • When to the gym – and enjoyed the steam room
  • Meditated
  • Went to a play (not a movie)
  • Walked in the park / went snowshoeing
  • Listened to music
  • Hand wrote a journal – or letters to friends / family

I’ve recently found a pod cast series called ‘On Being’ with Krista Tippett and I am enjoying how she explores the complications and beauty of human life. Krista is helping me sharpen my spiritual saw. (@Beingtweets)

Stephen R. Covey suggests targeting 1 hour / day to focus on Sharpening Your Saw.  If that works for you then terrific.

Conclusion

Over time remembering to Sharpen Your Saw will get easier to plan and do. Whatever you choose will become a feeder into a life of quality – the glass half full – abundance of your life.

Happy communicating.

Click here to join our priority list of people who receive our latest Business Communication blog posts.

If you enjoyed this post we think you’ll like:

Bruce Mayhew Consulting facilitates courses including Email Etiquette, Managing Difficult Conversations, Multigenerational Training, Time Management and Mindfulness.

Find answers to your Professional Development questions / needs at brucemayhewconsulting.com.

Give us a call at 416 617 0462. We’ll listen.

Bruce Mayhew on Canada AM

Click on the image to watch us on Canada AM.

I’d enjoy reading your comments on this post.

Reference Material:

  • Stephen R. Covey: 7 Habits of Highly Effective People ©
  • Michael Bungay Stanier: Do More Great Work ©
  • Walter Isaacson: Steve Jobs
  • My experience

7 Habits of Highly Effective People: Habit 6: Synergize

The first time I read Habit 6: Synergize from The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People I remember feeling a sense of a crescendo… that Habit 6 was unifying the previous Habits… both Personal Habits (Habits 1 – Habits 3), and the Interdependent Habits (Habits 4 – Habits 5… and 6). And then I came across a quote from Stephen R. Covey in the Habit 6 chapter that confirmed my feeling, it reads, “the true test and manifestation of all of the other habits put together.”Screen Shot 2014-03-07 at 4.31.35 PM

What Is Synergize?

Synergy is what happens when two or more forces choose to work together with open, trusting intention to embrace each others differences and to overcome the challenges that will inevitably arise.  The benefit of Synergy is that the end result will be something that is far superior to anything that could exist without the cooperation and sharing of the forces.

In The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People Stephen Covey writes about how:

  • Synergy has the ability to unify forces (people, departments, companies, countries)
  • Synergy is important to being an important leader and a successful, sustainable organization

In the context of two or more people – it is the minds, experiences, and openness and mutual respect of each person coming together that creates a new alternative.

Synergy & Steve Jobs

I believe synergy was a key approach Steve Jobs used to create the Apple empire (as I learned from the Steve Jobs biography written by Walter Isaacson). From this biography I don’t think I’d call Steve a great leader, but it does seem Steve Jobs was exceptionally good at identifying greatness in others, connecting people and inspiring them to find unique – new solutions to challenges (often that he imposed). Under his watch there was rapid product-line evolution and innovation.

Embrace Differences

It is important to note that it is our differences that make synergize possible.

Bruce Speaking On Global TV

Bruce Speaking On Global TV

The truth of Habit 6 is that differences are what make synergize so powerful.  For example: When two people have different experience / education and when they learn to embrace / respect each others differences and work together, what they create will be greater than what each individual could create on their own. If they are very similar, their accomplishment would not be synergy. Why? Because when everyone has similar values / needs etc… nobody is motivated to look for new opportunities – to stretch; compromise is Lose / Win.

Differences Example:  If you represent a lady’s shoe company with 100 customers and you buy another ladies shoe company with 100 customers, chances are the manufacturing, delivery, marketing will be similar and the merger will be relatively easy… but you are still representing a lady’s shoe company and in the end will likely have less than 200 customers – because of pre-existing customer overlap.

But, if you are representing a lady’s shoe company with 100 customers and you buy a mans shoe company with 100 customers, chances are the manufacturing, delivery, marketing will be different and there will be many challenges to work through (opportunity for synergy), as you merge… but because of synergy you are now representing a whole new shoe company and perhaps have up to 400 customers (cross selling to exiting customers husbands/wives/partners).

When there is a clearly defined common purpose, differences lead to better outcomes.

Embracing differences does not mean you have to become each others best friend. For example, when you have two or more leaders with strong Type A personalities working together… cooperation will be difficult sometimes. But, embracing differences does mean we have to remain open to the different ideas, values, needs and feelings of others.  When we do this we gain new insights and it is a learning opportunity (personal growth).

What’s Required For Synergize?

When people / companies work under these guidelines, synergy and new ideas begin to emerge.  Participants / companies have to:

  • Have one common vision – one common goal
  • Be different
  • Have a sense of self
  • Stay open to differences and new ideas – stay authentic
  • Embrace trust
  • Accept the better way will likely not be their way…100%
  • Offer respect to everyone – everything
  • Be able to apologize and forgive
  • Practice mindful listening (listen with empathy)
  • Maintain an open desire to understand
  • Control negative judgment
  • Stay with Win / Win (not Negative synergy Win/Lose or Lose)

Conclusion: Building Partnerships

When you synergize you have to spend less time fixing problems because your employees are working with each other and creating systems and learning expertise and efficiency as they drop their guards and increase synergy – between team members and across teams.

It is a struggle for people and companies to synergize because the ‘old’ way of doing business is more of a push system – not a collaborative, synergistic solution. But you can succeed by creating alignment / vision at the top and by training and supporting your staff to ensure synergy is taking place.

The highest level of communication is positive synergy (Win / Win) communication. The truly effective person remains positive by being is mindful of their own abilities and limitations, and respectful of the abilities… and limitations of the people around them.

Happy communicating.

Click here to join our priority list of people who receive our latest Business Communication blog posts.

If you enjoyed this post we think you’ll like:

Bruce Mayhew Consulting facilitates courses including Email Etiquette, Managing Difficult Conversations, Multigenerational Training, Time Management and Mindfulness.

Find answers to your Professional Development questions / needs at brucemayhewconsulting.com.

Give us a call at 416 617 0462. We’ll listen.

Bruce Mayhew on Canada AM

Click on the image to watch us on Canada AM.

I’d enjoy reading your comments on this post.

Reference Material:

  • Stephen R. Covey: 7 Habits of Highly Effective People ©
  • Michael Bungay Stanier: Do More Great Work ©
  • Walter Isaacson: Steve Jobs
  • My experience
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