A Checklist For Your Performance Management System

Performance management is a much more than correcting negative behavior throughout the year and recapping performance once-per-year with an annual performance review. It is much more.

Performance management includes activities such as joint goal setting, continuous progress review and frequent communication. The idea is to align an individuals core-competencies and goals to an organization’s core-competencies and goals. The idea is to ensure resources like talent are valued and maximized (monitored and respected), as much as resources like technology, equipment and finances are monitored and respected.

Performance management refocuses the lens on the individual, ensuring they have all of the knowledge, resources and motivation to exceed their capabilities and expectations… and because the individual does, so does the team and organization.

Checklist For Your Performance Management System

An effective performance management system will:

  1. Support each employee by being job specific, based on well written job descriptions, key performance indicators and job-related activities.
  2. Hire the right people by using a measurable interview / selection process (a BEI).
  3. Align with your organization’s strategic direction, culture and values.
  4. Be practical and easy to understand and use.
  5. Have the manager and employee work together to set personal and professional goals and behaviors… including measurement criteria. This includes why each goal and behavior is (or is not), important. This includes hard and soft skills.
  6. Create opportunities for clear and regular communication between managers and employees.
  7. Provide training and development opportunities for improving performance and helping employees achieve their work and career goals.
  8. Work with each employee to ensure their 3 top priorities (daily), are reflective of the agreed upon goals and Important Work (with exception of interdepartmental Urgent Work).
  9. Agree in advance how challenges will be managed.
  10. Provide ongoing constructive feedback when improvement is needed as well as positive feedback (praise), for work that exceeds agreed upon expectations.
  11. Train managers on how to manage, mentor, coach employees and how to have difficult conversations.
  12. Ensure there is commitment from management to quickly act on situations that are both positive and negative to support the process, the individual and the team.
  13. Periodically review the performance management process to ensure it is being applied consistently.
  14. Ensure each employee keeps a copy of the performance plan (work plan) so that they can refer to it.
  15. Establish an appeals process.
  16. Designing effective compensation and reward systems looking at the benefit of Intrinsic and Extrinsic motivators.
  17. Perform exit interviews to understand the cause of employee discontentment.

Each should refer to their goals regularly and meet to evaluate progress and make many smaller adjustments throughout the year.

Conclusion

If you are looking to create lasting change  look to how you can motivate your employees. When employees – and leaders are motivated they will do more… do it better… and finish earlier.

Happy communicating, mentoring, motivating… and training.

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Bruce Mayhew Consulting facilitates courses including Business Writing, Email Etiquette, Time Management, Mindfulness and More…

Find answers to your Professional Development questions / needs at brucemayhewconsulting.com.

Call us at 416.617.0462.

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Employee Survey? Yes, Just Do It!

Employee surveys used to be complicated and expensive to implement. Not anymore.

Because it was expensive, if a company implemented a survey they would often ask many questions – hoping to gather as much info as they could for their financial investment. With such an investment, writing the questions was often a long, drawn-out and political chore… and responding to them was equally unpleasant.

Times have changed – thankfully.

I just received a 2-question survey from my grocery chain. Did I answer it? Absolutely – without much thought. I didn’t even hesitate at the 10 second commitment.

 PC Plus Survey Final

While my graphic isn’t an employee survey, it is a great example of how surveys can be simplified and encourage participation.

Implementing employee surveys today is much more affordable. And, there are a number of reliable software service providers which provide flexible  branding and result collection options. Thankfully this has made surveys more accessible and organizations are being more targeted with their research.

Today the difficult part remains writing strategic, relevant survey questions. This is where the time and financial investment still needs to be applied which for organizations means getting the assistance of third parties (e.g., BMC). Like with most things, knowing what you want to achieve is your best first step.

What Do You Want To Achieve?

Employee surveys are wonderfully flexible and can be used to measure a variety of things in a workplace. As an example do you want to:

  • Get feedback on a new procedure.
  • Explore creative ideas your sales or front-line employees have.
  • Conduct a management-level 360 review.
  • Help employees be reflective of their behaviour – good and not so good.
  • Get employees ‘in the mood’ for the training you are going to do.
  • Remind employees of the training they’ve had.

While surveys are versatile, be careful to keep your objective simple – and if you can, keep your surveys to one topic.

I recently wrote and launched an pre-training employee survey for a workshop I was hired to design and facilitate. Because the survey results were only seen by me, the employees were very confident to answer honestly.

The results from the pre-training employee survey gave me valuable insight on how to position the professional development training; I was able to customize the training to meet specific needs. During the training workshops I was able to knowingly ‘lean into’ certain areas where I knew they would benefit the most. The results also helped me congratulate them (positive reinforcement works), on behaviour they were doing. It also meant I didn’t bore them by hammering home best practices that they were already doing.

Position Employee Surveys As Save Valuable Opportunities

Employee surveys can have huge benefit.

Be up-front with staff about how important the survey is. When you conduct a survey in the workplace, you are sending a message to employees that you value their suggestions, ideas and creativity. Don’t assume employees know this – be sure you say it. Explain you are genuinely interested in getting their input to improve them and/or the organization. Ask them to be open and honest – and if they might feel at risk in answering (which is normal), make sure the survey is anonymous.

Anonymous surveys often help gain honest feedback.

Employee surveys have the advantage of building employee morale. Employees will see first-hand they have a say in the training they receive, how the business operates, and even some of the policies moving forward; this often leads to increased loyalty and decreased turnover.

For Best Results

Be up-front with staff about how important the survey is to you. If they have one – work with the HR department. Explain to your audience that you are genuinely interested in getting their input. Ask them to be candid in their feedback and assure them that responses are anonymous (suggestion).

Finally, commit to putting the survey results to work. Employees will embrace change that they feel they have contributed to.

Conclusion

Surveys are great. If you are going to use one consider the need for the following three things:

  1. Know what your response deadline is. Whether it is the date you cut-off additional responses or the date you push / encourage your audience to respond by. Manage everyone’s expectations including your own and share your response deadline.
  2. Know who’s responding. If you are doing an employee survey it is often helpful to get a sense of the experience level with the company and/or position of the person responding. Often that can be achieved by adding one question for each.
  3. One advantage of an anonymous survey is that you can get honest and insightful feedback about topics employees might not be comfortable bringing to you in person.

Uncovering challenges employees are experiencing may keep valuable employees from looking work elsewhere – like your competitors – an expensive loss from many different angles.

Happy communicating and survey design.

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Performance-Based Learning and Assessment: When Theory Becomes Experience

Performance-Based learning turns knowledge into experience.

When students leave school most have lots of knowledge and little experience – then as they work and apply their knowledge they gain experience. When employees participate in personal development training that includes Performance-Based learning as part of the course design, participants leave with knowledge and experience.

Performance-Based learning combines knowledge with application.Performance-Based Learning

BMC believe the best approach is to develop Performance-Based exercises using cues and situations from the learners’ environment. While tailoring training examples takes a little more effort, it pays off for the learner and the client. New skills are understood and adopted with greater success because the learner is familiar with the situations we use.

In addition, Performance-Based learning paired with appreciative inquiry provides participants the opportunity to learn in a safe environment and to integrate new skills with existing knowledge / habits in a meaningful way. Three behaviors to evaluate include:

  • Learning: What knowledge, skills or awareness was shared?
  • Behavior: What behaviours were changed or adopted and/or beliefs influenced?
  • Results: What will happen as a result of the training – is it the desired behaviour?

Performance-Based Assessment Options

Evaluation using any method improves participants’ engagement during training.

Options for in-class assessment include:

  • Self-assessment
  • Peer-assessment
  • Instructor assessment and/or evaluate self assessment
  • A combination of all the above

Performance-Based learning throughout any professional development & career training empowers the learner by helping participants assess and therefore be able to qualify and quantify their own learning.

Because participants receive immediate feedback they are able to make frequent small adjustments. This offers them reward that are connected with their newly learned skill, and frequent small adjustments helps them achieve greater overall success and behaviour adoption. In addition, frequent self and/or peer assessment encourages participants to participate during the training.

Group Discussion

Performance-Based learning and assessment often includes group discussion.

Within group discussion, participants hear questions and stories from other participants, therefore, everyone learns from each other. Participants also get to see how others ‘think’ and that in most cases – every problem will likely have multiple valid but different solutions. This reinforces the concept of different points of view which is helpful when they return to their duties and work with peers and/or clients.

Group discussion combines the benefits of self-assessment and respectful peer-assessment.

Conclusion

Performance-Based learning and assessment translates to greater retention and faster adoption of the new materials.New theories become experiences which increases participants ability to apply the information when they are on their own.

Happy communicating and learning.

Click here to join our priority list of people who receive our latest Business Communication blog posts. If you enjoyed this post we think you’ll like:

Bruce Mayhew Consulting facilitates courses including Email Etiquette, Managing Difficult Conversations, Mindfulness and more.

Give us a call at 416 617 0462. We’ll listen.

Bruce Mayhew on Canada AM

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Find answers to your Professional Development questions / needs at brucemayhewconsulting.com.

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Motivating Change At Work Using Observational Learning

Change at work is in the air. Perhaps you have a new employee, perhaps you are providing your sales team professional development training on how to use business stories with customers, or perhaps you want to keep your corporate values and vision top of mind by reintroducing them to your employees.

Supporting change is a significant investment, so how can you motivate change at work using observational learning to increase your return on investment (ROI)? This blog post looks at a few approaches that are valuable to consider.

Observational Learning ImageWhat Is Observational Learning?

Observational learning is an excellent way to change or reinforce behaviour.

Observational learning happens when a person watches (observes), the behaviour of another and as a result of that observation they adopt that behaviour. First identified as the primary way very young children learn, we now know observational learning is a very effective way to teach adults. This includes learning new behaviours or increasing / decreasing the frequency of existing behaviours.

While time to practice a new behaviour may be required, observational learning is very efficient. How long it takes to adopt the new behaviour depends on:

  • The observer being motivated to keep their attention on the task or educator
  • The observer having the awareness to identify and remember the behaviour
  • The observer having the physical and/or intellectual ability to adopt the behaviour or to learn how
  • Reinforcement (how appropriate it is and if it is positive vs. negative)

Lets take a closer look at Motivation and Reinforcement… two often overlooked steps in training.

Observational Learners Must Be Motivated

Motivation is key to learning.

The important thing to remember is that each of us – especially people from different generations will be motivated by different things at different times. For example, perhaps your organization is encouraging the use of business stories to express new corporate values. Your observer / learner will be more motivated to learn and change if they see this as an opportunity to:

  • Give them a unique opportunity like to work on a high-profile project. A millennial might connect well with this motivation.
  • Make them eligible for a financially rewarding promotion. A Boomer might connect well with this motivation.
  • Learn transferable skills… and give them more time for family. A Gen X might connect well with this motivation.

Another important motivator most of us can relate to is for the observer / learner to see the educator as an authority, to respect and/or to be inspired by them. As a general rule observers more quickly adopt the behaviour of someone who possesses one or more of the following characteristics:

  • Experience / expertise
  • Intelligence
  • Power
  • Popularity
  • Good looks

This is true whether the changed behaviour is to start doing something… or to stop doing something.

What Is Reinforcement?

An observer’s behaviour can be affected by either positive or negative reinforcement.

A technicality we should be clear on is that ‘Reinforcement’ is not the same as ‘Reward’. You reinforce behaviour by providing a reward… be it a positive reward or a negative reward. For example:

  • Adults are given negative rewards like speeding tickets to reinforce good behaviour and to stop bad behaviour.
  • Adults can be given positive rewards like a ‘free’ day off to reinforce going above and beyond expectations with a client.

Again, reinforcement is anything that increases the likelihood that a person will mirror an action and/or repeat a pervious action again… but it is not a reward.

Conclusion 

Understanding motivators and reinforcement are key to observational learning success. Why? Because if you understand what a persons motivators are – you can design rewards that are tailored to provide the greatest reinforcement. This provides you maximum return on your training and reward investment.

Notes:

  1. While it can take place at any point in life, observational learning tends to be the most common during childhood as children learn from the authority figures and peers in their lives.
  2. Observational learning is often linked to negative or undesirable behaviors, but it is also very powerful to inspire positive behaviors.
  3. Observational learning is also called social learning theory, shaping, modeling, and vicarious reinforcement.

Happy communicating, learning and changing.

Click here to join our priority list of people who receive our latest Business Communication blog posts. If you enjoyed this post we think you’ll like:

Bruce Mayhew Consulting facilitates courses including Email Etiquette, Managing Difficult Conversations, Mindfulness and more.

Give us a call at 416 617 0462. We’ll listen.

Bruce Mayhew on Canada AM

Click on the image to watch us on Canada AM.

Find answers to your Professional Development questions / needs at brucemayhewconsulting.com.

I’d enjoy reading your comments on this post.

The 2 Things Great Business Stories Have!

What are the 2 things great business stories have no matter if you share them on your website, in sales calls or within presentations?

Great business stories are living assets that everyone can use to learn, teach and/or build relationships. And it may surprise you what these wisdom-packed, brand-building content marketing tools should always include.

It’s not facts and figures… and it’s not testimonials (although testimonials can be good if used well)! To do their job well, great business stories should have both emotion and suspense in order to feed the inquisitive nature of readers/listeners.

Why Emotion and Suspense?

Image courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Even corporate clients make decisions based on emotions (there – I said it out loud). Emotions may influence decisions only a little… but they do influence. For example, want, fear and pride are three strong emotions that can influence behaviour; let me show you what I mean. Lets say you have a corporate client/prospect. Do they want to grow – to gain more market share? Do they fear the possible missed opportunities if they do not purchase XYZ? Are they proud of their (personal or corporate), reputation as an innovative leader?

A clients’ emotional and business response to a story can be an important part of your success… and you don’t even have to be present. For example, after reading some of your business stories a prospect can actually short-list you as a provider before you ever meet.

Personal and corporate pride were huge triggers for Steve Jobs.

Suspense is important in a business story because suspense keeps your audience entertained and therefore interested. People like things like crisis, conflict and tension… and they long for resolution/balance.  If you can create suspense around a crisis, your audience will stay hooked to find out how it was resolved.

Bruce Speaking On Global TV about Millennials

Bruce Speaking On Global TV about Millennials

One way to create suspense is to encourage your audience to work a bit. If the answer is going to be C, then give them A and then B… and then provide them a moment to get to C on their own. One added benefit of holding them in suspense is that you may learn something based on how your audience resolved the challenge. For example, if they arrived at the answer D:

  • How did they get to D – what variables got them there?
  • What does D mean to them – personally and professionally? 

Any resolution that they come up with on their own can provide valuable information to you in a sales or training environment.

Conclusion

There is always going to be more than one way to tell a story and, like with a great painting, how someone interprets a story will depend on their personal and professional knowledge, experience and needs/objectives. Nevertheless, it is your role as a story-teller to get your audience excited and keep them interested.

Great business stories grab your audience and best of all, people retain stories far longer than facts and figures. So, have you built your library of business stories yet?

Happy story creating and story telling. 

Click here to join our priority list of people who receive our latest Business Communication blog posts. If you enjoyed this post we think you’ll like:

Bruce Mayhew Consulting facilitates courses including Email Etiquette, Managing Difficult Conversations, Multigenerational Training, Time Management and Mindfulness.

Find answers to your Professional Development questions / needs at brucemayhewconsulting.com.

Give us a call at 416 617 0462. We’ll listen.

Bruce Mayhew on Canada AM

Click on the image to watch us on Canada AM.

I’d enjoy reading your comments on this post.

Listening Skills: Are Yours Motivating Others To Be Their Best?

Active listening skills create feelings of respect, cooperation and care between the two or more people.

We’ve all learned to have good or bad listening skills – often from a very young age. As adults and business leaders, it’s important to recognize that these habits likely dominate our personal communication style… and that we are responsible for the consequences of those habits.

Free image courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Free image courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net

When we’re not being listened to, we often begin to wonder what’s wrong with us. We can begin questioning our value, our participation and creativity. If this happens at work we become less valuable to our employer and our team. If this happens at home it can lead to communication breakdown and the end of a relationship (“He doesn’t understand me or care for me anymore”). Both are lose–lose situations.

By being open and listening to others (showing them the same courtesy you expect), we gain more respect and cooperation from coworkers, customers, and partners / families. Holding others in high regard motivates others to want to work with us. Good listening skills motivate others to be their best and to work hard to please us.

By being closed and not listening you push people away and it’s natural for the person or people we don’t listen to to get out of that space – and try not to return. If it is a work environment, this may lead us to not contributing to discussions or keep ourselves out of some projects or meetings completely. Continued feelings like self-doubt and frustration will likely also lead to quitting the department or company. An expensive proposition for the company (to lose valuable talent and to have to hire and train new talent.

How We Feel When We Aren’t Heard

When we’re not listened to (when we are not being heard), we become discouraged – deflated.  We can feel:

  • Self doubt
  • Insulted
  • Less important
  • Vulnerable
  • That something is wrong ‘with me’
  • Embarrassed
  • Exposed
  • Hurt
  • Frustrated
  • May feel that our time / our core competency isn’t valued

How do you feel when you are not being listened to?

Reasons For Poor Listening

There are many reasons we may not be listening.  Some may be workload or an urgent need, some our personal style, some may be based in generational experiences or cultural / hierarchical beliefs. For example:

  • You think you have the solution (“I know – do this.”)
  • You think you are being efficient (“Do this – get it done – move on.”)
  • You have no interest (“You or this topic bores me.”)
  • Hierarchical (“I’m senior – do as I say.”)
  • Your attention is elsewhere (“I need to finish that big project by Friday.” or “I’m upset because my friend is in the hospital.”)
  • The other persons needs / points of view are different from your own. You see this as disagreement and therefore dismiss the other person or see them as a threat. (“I don’t agree.”)
  • You feel you are being used (“Bruce is asking me to put aside my work for his – therefore he must think he is more important than me… or his work is more important than mine.”)

Conclusion

Communication is a skill and listening requires respectful encouragement. We all have to learn to be more conscious listeners – to listen with curiosity and interest and to ‘park’ the assumptions we make – even if we think we know the answer or best solution. We have to learn to recognize when we are being open (good listeners) vs. closed (poor listeners), and what both feel like – for ourselves and the people around us.

Effective listening takes practice but is well worth it – paying back our career and company revenues and our relationships.

Happy communicating.

Click here to join our priority list of people who receive our latest Business Communication blog posts.

If you enjoyed this post we think you’ll like:

Bruce Mayhew Consulting facilitates courses including Email Etiquette, Managing Difficult Conversations, Multigenerational Training, Time Management and Mindfulness.

Find answers to your Professional Development questions / needs at brucemayhewconsulting.com.

Give us a call at 416 617 0462. We’ll listen.

Bruce Mayhew on Canada AM

Click on the image to watch us on Canada AM.

I’d enjoy reading your comments on this post.

When To Say No… And Be Labeled As Helpful.

This is a delicate topic and the key to success is to know when to say ‘No’ and how to say ‘No’.

To properly explore these topics, I’ve created two blog posts – one for each topic. This is the first post which explores, When To Say ‘No’.When To Say No

Most everyone I meet would like to do more interesting work, get ahead and enjoy more quality time… and often this translates to trying to find ways to get more done. Translation = more reward with roughly the same amount of time investment.

Fitting time management best practices into your work and living routine is a great way to stay in control and stand out in the crowd. As part of good time management best practices, a critical component is to know when to say ‘No’ … and not be labeled as unhelpful, unwilling or a poor team player can have serious negative impacts on your long-term career.

The first thing I think is important to identify is that all decisions are not weighted equally. For example:

  • Big decisions – Do you accept the promotion? You’ll have to move 1,000 miles and uproot your family.
  • Medium decisions – Do you accept the special project? You’ll work most nights and weekends for 2 months.
  • Small decisions – Do you help a co-worker build a presentation outline? It will take an afternoon.
  • Miniscule decisions – Do you proofread a co-workers memo to a supplier? It will take 10 minutes.

For you to decide your best course of action, I believe you need to explore the answers to 3 big questions:

  1. What is your goal / your objective? Does the request being made of you meet with your short & long-term plans, job objectives, personal skill set, and / or will it give you experience / exposure to want?
  2. What is your current reputation? Do you have a reputation? If you don’t have one you have to build it… and likely you should say ‘Yes’ more often than ‘No’.  If you have built a reputation as being earnest, hardworking, a team player, good time manager dedicated to quality service, you’ll have some good-will and therefore have a bit more flexibility to choose.
  3. How valuable / senior are you?  If you are new to the company / industry and / or just out of school and want to get ahead, be prepared to work beyond 9 to 5. If you’ve already made yourself indispensable to the company, you’ll have some flexibility to choose.

A Personal Look Back: Real Experience

When I was just out of university and working my dream job I said yes to almost everything that came near me. In fact I often went looking for new projects, and this approach worked out for me. I know that at times I overextended myself – and that working on special projects meant I didn’t always get an exceeds expectations performance rating (and so I lost out on a slightly larger end-of-year bonus), but I also know those special projects met with my intended goals to give me experiences and introduced me to people I otherwise would not have had.

And even though I sometimes overextended myself, the key to my early decision was that I never risked my job or my team. I never put the job I was hired to do in jeopardy… and because people saw I was willing to take on special projects, they identified me as someone who wanted more and was willing to work hard.

Building Your Reputation

As with my experience, new employees get more experience, meet important people, get their name heard by important people and have more opportunities to prove themselves when they say ‘Yes’ to many tasks.

To get where you want to be in your career as quickly as possible I believe most of us have to make an investment… and that might mean giving up things early in your career to meet your long-term goals. You’ll likely miss some dinner parties, weekends at the cottage, teacher / parent interviews, and perhaps even your children’s piano recital. And after years (not months), of hard work you’ll have created a reputation that helps you say ‘No’ (and create more of a work/life balance).

Conclusion

While saying ‘No’ will almost always help you focus on your immediate work, it might also narrow your long-term career options and reputation.

Being mindful of when to say ‘No’ and how to say ‘No’ is one of the most important opportunities for you to gain better control over your time management and personal productivity… and therefore help you achieve your long-term career goals.

Happy communicating.

Click here to join our priority list of people who receive our latest Business Communication blog posts.

If you enjoyed this post we think you’ll like:

Bruce Mayhew Consulting facilitates courses including Email Etiquette, Managing Difficult Conversations, Multigenerational Training, Time Management and Mindfulness.

Find answers to your Professional Development questions / needs at brucemayhewconsulting.com.

Give us a call at 416 617 0462. We’ll listen.

Bruce Mayhew on Canada AM

Click on the image to watch us on Canada AM.

I’d enjoy reading your comments on this post.

Accelerated Learning: How Business Training Can Benefit.

Learning styles research tells us different people learn in different ways (OK – we didn’t need research to tell us that).

There have been many learning models to support this. Some models outline three learning styles – other models outline four, eight or more learning styles and associated learning cycles. In a later blog I’ll create a comparison of a few popular learning styles like Kolb and DISC.

No matter which model you use or how many individual learning preferences you focus on, the one thing every trainer should consider is that almost everyone learns best when many learning styles are engaged. This is called Accelerated Learning.

Accelerated Learning

The name given to learning that engages multiple learning styles in a training environment is ‘Accelerated Learning’. The benefit of Accelerated Learning is that it’s a multi-pronged approach to training (especially business training), that should results in improved retention (learning), in less time. This is a plus to help your organization see a greater Return on Investment (ROI).

The best training design therefore combines both traditional fact-based linear training and active learning – alternating frequently / never keeping one going for a long time.

Active Learning does not mean throwing in a few games or plans to get participants to stretch or dance every hour during a traditional fact-based linear training program. It may however include a combination of experiences including:

  • Auditory stimulation
  • Physical movement
  • Sequential learning
  • Analytical exercises
  • Intuitive thinking
  • Hands-on experiences

Why Does Accelerated Learning Work?

Switching between multiple learning styles works because it lets each individual benefit from their preferred learning style, and then also use the other learning styles to reinforce knowledge transfer. Makes sense right? And there is an added benefit that switching between multiple learning styles help keep participants engaged and awake (seriously).

The irony is that traditional fact-based lectures are still predominantly the norm. The problem is that traditional learning (fact-based linear learning), keeps participants physically inactive and most often (within 5 to 20 minutes), participants unconsciously become disengaged. This is true for the child and the adult learner.

It’s not that traditional fact-based lectures are bad. In fact, short burst are great support to have within an Accelerated Learning program.

Conclusion:

Even people with similar learning styles are not the same. We are all different, so even if you and I share the same primary learning style, our preferred learning process will be different. To demonstrate, consider three very natural variables:

  • How quickly each of us learn
  • How dominant our preferred learning style is (i.e.: strong or weak)
  • What our secondary learning style is (and is it being used during training)

So, even though two people with the same preferred primary learning style will learn at a different pace, using multiple learning styles that involve our emotions, body movement, our senses and the full breadth and depth of our personalities will enhance our learning.

To succeed in introducing Active Learning, openly communicate with employees what they will experience and ask them to ‘listen’ and ‘be active’ without judging. Before you know it, they will be fully engaged – to the best of their abilities and learning styles. Mindfulness is key.

______________________________________________________

What might be your primary Kolb learning style?

Accommodating

The Accommodating learning style is ‘hands-on’, and relies on intuition rather than logic. They commonly act on ‘gut’ instinct rather than logical analysis and prefer to work in teams.

Diverging

The Diverging learning styles prefers to watch rather than do, tending to gather information and use imagination to solve problems, tend to be imaginative and emotional, and prefer to work in groups.

Assimilating

The Assimilating learning preference is for a concise, logical approach. These people like to work alone, require good clear explanation, and prefer readings, lectures and having time to think things through.

Converging

People with a Converging style like to experiment with new ideas, to simulate, and to work with practical applications. Prefer technical tasks and to work alone.

Happy communicating… Happy training.

Click here to join our priority list of people who receive our latest Business Communication blog posts.

If you enjoyed this post we think you’ll like:

Bruce Mayhew Consulting facilitates courses including Email Etiquette, Managing Difficult Conversations, Multigenerational Training, Time Management and Mindfulness.

Find answers to your Professional Development questions / needs at brucemayhewconsulting.com.

Give us a call at 416 617 0462. We’ll listen.

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